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Survey Says: SF Wants More Sustainability, Less Golf

A new survey released by the Neighborhood Parks Council shows that San Franciscans want more sustainability in their park system and fewer expenditures on golf: which is precisely why restoring Sharp Park is great public policy for San Francisco.

“Restoring Sharp Park is a sensible solution that helps the Recreation and Parks Department supply what park users demand,” said Brent Plater, Executive Director of the Wild Equity Institute. “We can reduce wasteful spending on regional golf in San Mateo County while providing a sustainable solution to the myriad problems the golf course faces. It isn’t often you get win-win solutions in park management: the City should seize this one immediately.”

The Neighborhood Parks Council surveyed 1,443 San Francisco residents in October and November of 2010, asking dozens of questions about San Francisco’s parks. In one question, respondents were asked to list three priorities for park funding. Of the nearly 100 different responses, sustainability came in 5th, behind only general park maintenance, better athletic fields, more programming, and improved safety. In a second question, respondents were asked to list three expenses they’d like to see cut. Of the over 80 different responses to this question, cutting golf expenses came in 5th, behind only salaries and overtime pay, construction projects, regional attractions, and wasteful spending.

Sharp Park Golf Course is a wetland that San Francisco drains regularly so golfers can play there for about $30 a round. The course loses money every year, siphoning scarce recreation dollars from San Francisco’s community centers and city services. A broad coalition has been working to transfer Sharp Park to the National Park Service and redirect the money San Francisco saves back to neighborhood parks, where the money belongs.

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Thanks for the Warmth, Congrats to our Winners!

Thanks to the 75+ supporters of the Wild Equity Institute and our suite mates, Restore Hetch Hethcy, that helped warm our office and bring the 2010 GGNP Endangered Species Big Year to a close.


Members enjoyed delicious foods and wines generously donated by
Arizmendi Bakery and Muir-Hanna Vineyards

We spent some time honoring our Big Year winners: Steve Price and Liam O’Brien were once again crowned co-champions, while Molly Latimer won a free pair of binoculars from REI’s San Francisco Store for being the top youth competitor. Kate and Gofi Gelles rounded out the top five finishers in the Big Year competition. Congratulations to you all!

And we couldn’t have done it without the support of Barbara Beth, who received special acknowledgement as the Wild Equity Institute’s Volunteer of the Year for 2010!

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Students Take Action for the Underfrog

Recently students from San Francisco’s public high schools visited Mori Point and the controversial Sharp Park Golf Course. They learned about the impacts the course is having on the San Francisco garter snake and the California red-legged frog, and learned what they can do to help these species recover. You can join them: send a message to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors and tell ’em to Restore Sharp Park!

Best. Hate. Voicemail. Ever!


Artwork by Liam O’Brien

The Wild Equity Institute’s lawsuit to protect the Lange’s Metalmark Butterfly was a hot topic with Bay Area media outlets this week, covered by The Bay Citizen, CBS 5, and the Contra Costa Times. But our favorite story was left on our voicemail: by someone with a decidedly different point of view.

This message has the hallmarks of an all-time classic. It’s anonymous, inaccurate, breathlessly angry, and masterfully on message: in under thirty seconds it gets all the talk radio insults in. This guy should be giving clinics.

Listen to the message for the full effect, but here’s the text:

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GGNRA Dog Plan Released: WEI Discusses on KQED 1/17

The Golden Gate National Recreation Area has released its long-awaited Dog Management Plan, and will be taking public comment on the proposal for the next 90 days. The Wild Equity Institute’s Executive Director Brent Plater will be a guest on KQED’s Forum (88.5 FM) to discuss the plan Monday, January 17th at 9:00 a.m. You can bring your voice to the debate by calling 866-733-6786 or emailing forum@kqed.org.

Weighing-in at over 2,000 pages and over six years in the making, bystanders might look at the plan and conclude that the GGNRA’s priorities are misplaced. If, for example, the GGNRA tackled more pressing environmental problems like climate adaptation this thoroughly, we might have a carbon neutral park by now.

Yet in other respects pet management contains the same moral dilemmas as our most pressing environmental problems:

  • Who should bear the burden of activities conducted in National Parks: the individuals taking action or the public as a whole?
  • When should individual entitlement take precedence over public responsibility?
  • Does the Park have a duty to proactively protect park visitors from harm, or should the Park simply facilitate recompense after an injury has occurred?

These are common questions to most environmental problems, yet despite the plan’s length and delay, it still fails to address some basic problems with pet management at the GGNRA.

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WEI Heads to Court to Protect Antioch's Communities and Wildlife

On Friday, January 21, the Wild Equity Institute will appear in court to protect human health and endangered species. You can attend the oral argument: it is scheduled to start at 9 a.m. in courtroom 10 on the 19th floor of the United States District Court for the Northern District of California.

The lawsuit involves PG&E’s Gateway Generating Station, a natural gas power plant in Antioch. Because of several miscues by regulatory agencies and calculated risks taken by PG&E, the power plant was constructed and continues to operate without federal air pollution permits. Community groups concerned about the power plant’s pollution discovered that the requisite permits weren’t in place, and brought suit to demand pollution reductions to protect human health. Unfortunately, the EPA is now attempting to cut a sweetheart deal with PG&E over the legal violation: without first considering the impacts of this deal on endangered species at the Antioch Dunes National Wildlife Refuge, including the Lange’s Metalmark Butterfly, the Contra Costa Wallflower, and the Antioch Dunes Evening Primrose.

This is a serious concern because the same pollution that is impacting human health is also polluting endangered species habitats at the Refuge, which is less than 1 mile from the power plant. Nitrogen emissions from the power plant change the chemical composition of the dune soil, creating favorable conditions for invasive weeds. These weeds crowd out the endangered plants and the host plant for the Lange’s Metalmark Butterfly. The Butterfly, already on the precipice of extinction, is closely associated with its host plant, and when the host plant is crowded out the Butterfly’s population plummets even further.

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Students, Wildlife Get a Second Chance with WEI

The Wild Equity Institute has partnered with Downtown High School in San Francisco to give students and endangered species a second chance at life.

“We’ve been inspired by the students at Downtown High School and the empathy they’ve shown toward each other and to other forms of life,” said Brent Plater, Executive Director of the Wild Equity Institute. “We’re grateful for the opportunity to help them succeed both in and out of the classroom.”

The joint project is called “Endangered Semester,” and it provides students who have not succeeded in traditional classrooms an opportunity to see 10 endangered species in the field, while taking 10 actions that help these species recover. It is a competitive event: as the students see and help save endangered species, they earn prizes that help their class succeed.


Endangered Semester Presentation at Downtown High School

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Endangered Species, Endangered Buses

Artist Todd Gilens has implemented a fascinating new public art project that highlights the link between how we treat each other, and how we treat other forms of life.

The project is called Endangered Bus. Todd has placed photos of several imperiled species on San Francisco MUNI buses to highlight the similar challenges we face addressing these collective problems: saving endangered species on the one hand, and providing affordable, reliable public transit on the other.


Coho Salmon Endangered Bus


Salt Marsh Harvest Mouse Endangered Bus

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1/27: Office Opening, Big Year Closing Party

The 2010 Golden Gate National Parks Endangered Species Big Year has come to a close, and some familiar faces ended up at the top of the leader board.

Liam O’Brien and Steven Price tied for first place this year: just as they did in the inaugural 2008 Big Year competition. Rounding out the top finishers were two new competitors—Kate & Gofi Gelles—and Molly Latimer, our youngest competitor in the running for the top prize. Congratulations to you all!

This year we’ll be celebrating the Big Year winners in a new location: the Wild Equity Institute’s first office! We’re co-hosting an office warming party on January 27, 2011 from 5pm until 7pm, with our suite-mates, Restore Hetch Hetchy.


Minding our footprint: our new office is furnished
entirely with donated, recycled, and salvaged materials.

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Comment on Unleashed Dogs in the GGNRA

The Golden Gate National Recreation Area may finally start enforcing leash laws at the GGNRA: and you will have two opportunities to encourage them to do so in the coming weeks.

Off-leash dogs at the GGNRA negatively impact people, our pets, wildlife, and park resources. Imperiled wildlife like the western snowy plover are frequently harassed by off-leash dogs; guide dog users are regularly interfered with—and occasionally attacked—by off-leash dogs; and perhaps most alarmingly, hundreds of off-leash dogs have been lost, injured, or killed when they fall off cliffs, run into traffic, or otherwise lose their owners.

It doesn’t have to be this way. We can make off-leash dog play areas that are safe for everyone, including our dogs.

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Federal Golf Bailout Stopped! For Now . . .

Thanks to thousands of calls and emails from supporters like you, the federal bailout of Sharp Park Golf Course proposed by Congresswoman Jackie Speier was not adopted by the 111th Congress before the congressional session expired. This means that the bailout proposal is over: unless it is reintroduced and passes both the House of Representatives and the Senate during the 112th Congress. With the Republican takeover of the House of Representatives, this seems unlikely to occur.

“Democrats & Republicans, environmentalists and budget hawks, social service providers and open space advocates all agree: there should be no federal bailout of Sharp Park Golf Course,” said Brent Plater, Executive Director of the Wild Equity Institute. “If federal dollars are spent at Sharp Park, taxpayers deserve a federal asset in return, and the best asset would be a National Park that everyone can enjoy, not just golfers.”


A Restoration Vision for Sharp Park.

The federal golf bailout submitted by Representative Speier would have taken money dedicated to wetland restoration and used it to build a sea wall at Sharp Park. To justify this diversion of funds, the Congresswoman argued that the sea wall was needed to protect endangered species at Sharp Park. However, ecologists and biologists that have reviewed the proposal determined that the opposite is true: the sea wall would doom Sharp Park’s endangered species while causing Sharp Park Beach to erode away.

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Big Year Finds Endangered Coho Spawners in Muir Woods

On December 26, 2010, a dozen Golden Gate National Park Endangered Species Big Year participants found the first endangered Coho Salmon spawning in Muir Woods National Monument this spawning season.

“Santa came a day late, but he brought quite a gift,” said Brent Plater, Executive Director of the Wild Equity Institute. “The numbers are still critically low, but anytime salmon spawn it is reason to celebrate.”

The sighting was reported to the National Park Service, which sent out an emergency survey team. The team discovered 5 adult Coho salmon and 2 redds (which are essentially salmon nests) in Muir Woods. Additional surveys are now planned for later in the season.

Endangered Species Big Year Participants Observe Coho Salmon in Muir Woods.

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Lawsuit Launched to Protect the Lange's Metalmark Butterfly from PG&E Power Plant

December 28, 2010

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Brent Plater, Wild Equity Institute, 415-572-6989

Lawsuit Launched to Protect the Lange’s Metalmark Butterfly from PG&E Power Plant

Nitrogen Emissions Threaten Survival of Critically Endangered Butterfly

ANTIOCH, CA— Today the Wild Equity Institute filed a formal notice of intent to sue the Environmental Protection Agency for issuing air pollution permits to PG&E’s Gateway Generating Station without first evaluating the power plant’s impacts on the Lange’s Metalmark Butterfly, an endangered species whose only home is less than a mile away from the Gateway Generating Station.

“When the EPA takes short cuts with environmental health, disadvantaged communities and wildlife often suffer the most,” said Brent Plater, Executive Director of the Wild Equity Institute. “Today’s action will help us create a healthier environment for people and for the plants and animals that accompany us on Earth.”

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Sharp Park Golf Course Floods: Again

Even though San Francisco dumped $300,000 of taxpayer money into new pumps and repaired drainage pipes at Sharp Park over the past two fiscal years, the controversial Sharp Park Golf Course is—once again—severely flooded.

Photographs Taken December 18 & 19, 2010.

Sharp Park Golf Course has had problems with water management since its inception. The golf course’s poor design and unfortunate placement has resulted in flooding from coastal storm surges and from normal winter rains nearly every year.

The ongoing flooding problems highlight the futility of maintaing an 18-hole golf course in this inappropriate location. Millions of dollars of public money would be required to defy nature and defend the golf course’s existing location: money that would be better spent on public parks everyone can enjoy.

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Last Big Year Trip of the Year: Dec. 26, Get Your Spawn On!

We’ll be heading to Muir Woods to close our the 2010 Golden Gate National Parks Endangered Species Big Year with a trip to search for spawning Coho Salmon and Steelhead. The fish have been returning in larger numbers than we’ve seen in the past two years, but they are still critically low. We will almost certainly see some young fry in the streams: but we’ll really be looking for the big spawners swimming up stream. Rain or shine: so see you outside!

Get Your Spawn On: Searching for Endangered Salmon in Muir Woods — Sunday, December 26, 2010, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.: Join Brent Plater of the Wild Equity Institute as we take an easy stroll through Muir Woods National Monument to search for endangered salmonids in Redwood Creek. We’ll learn about the lives of Coho Salmon and Steelhead as the fish return from the Ocean, and discuss what we all can do to help them recover. Part of the Golden Gate National Parks Endangered Species Big Year, a competition to see and help save the Park’s endangered species. Trip goes rain or shine: dress for cold, wet weather and wear boots as trails may be muddy. RSVP required: please use the RSVP tool on this website to RSVP. Meet at the Dipsea Trail Trailhead: the trailhead is within the auxiliary/south parking lot for Muir Woods. Park entrance fees apply, but the hike is free.

5K Matching Grant Offered: Donate to WEI Now!

An anonymous Wild Equity Institute donor has pledged up to $5,000 to our work: if we can get our community to match it!

Here’s the deal: For every dollar we raise during our end-of-year fundraising drive, our donor will match it — up to $5,000!

This means you can double your impact by donating today: for every dollar you contribute, another dollar will be donated to our work.

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Rose Foundation Supports the Wild Equity Institute

The Rose Foundation for Communities and the Environment announced their continued support of the Wild Equity Institute and our campaign to restore Sharp Park on December 14, 2010.

“We are grateful for the Rose Foundation’s generous grant,” said Brent Plater, executive director of the Wild Equity Institute. We’re proud of the diverse coalition we’ve built to restore Sharp Park, and the Rose Foundation’s support will help us continue this important work."

The Wild Equity Institute is working to transform Sharp Park from a money losing, endangered species killing golf course into a public park that naturally adapts to sea level rise, protects coastal communities from flooding events, recovers endangered species, and provides recreational access everyone can enjoy.

A Restoration Vision for Sharp Park.

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This Weekend: Big Year Bike Ride in SF, Twain's Frog in Pacifica

The 2010 Golden Gate National Parks Endangered Species Big Year is getting frenetic as we close out this year’s competition. This weekend we’re offering two trips to see and save endangered species: one by bike, the other on foot. Hope to see you at either or both!

Big Year Helps Least Tern, Sunday 12/12

Sunday, December 12, 2010, 9:00am – 12:00pm — Help the Wild Equity Institute prepare habitat for the California Least Tern nesting season with Friends of the Alameda Wildlife Refuge. Meet at the main refuge gate at the northwest corner of the former Alameda Naval Air Station, Alameda. Part of the Golden Gate National Parks Endangered Species Big Year, a competition to see and save endangered species. RSVP Required: use this website to RSVP.

Get Your Spawn On: Muir Woods Salmon Hike 12/11

This weekend we’ll be heading to Muir Woods to search for endangered salmonids returning to spawn in their natal creeks. The population has been struggling the last few years, but we should at least get to see some small fry in the streams—and if we’re lucky, a few large adults swimming upstream to spawn!

Saturday, December 11, 2010, 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.: Join Brent Plater of the Wild Equity Institute as we take an easy stroll through Muir Woods National Monument to search for endangered salmonids in Redwood Creek. We’ll learn about the lives of Coho Salmon and Steelhead as the fish return from the Ocean, and discuss what we all can do to help them recover. Part of the Golden Gate National Parks Endangered Species Big Year, a competition to see and help save the Park’s endangered species. The trip goes rain or shine: dress for cold, wet weather and wear boots as trails may be muddy. RSVP required: please use this website to RSVP. Meet at the Dipsea Trail Trailhead: the trailhead is within the auxiliary/south parking lot for Muir Woods. Park entrance fees apply, but the hike is free.

SF Commissioner Agrees to Meet with WEI and Allies About Sharp Park Lawsuit

Mark Buell, the new President of San Francisco’s Recreation and Parks Commission, has agreed to meet with the Wild Equity Institute, Surfrider Foundation, National Parks Conservation Association, Sequoia Audubon, San Francisco League of Conservation Voters, and the Center for Biological Diversity after being put on notice of a forthcoming lawsuit over the City’s violation of environmental laws at Sharp Park Golf Course. The groups are represented by the Washington, D.C. public-interest law firm Meyer Glitzenstein & Crystal.

A restoration vision for Sharp Park.

“The coalition of environmental, justice, and social service organizations calling for closing Sharp Park Golf Course continues to grow and is stronger than ever before,” says Brent Plater, Executive Director of the Wild Equity Institute. “We’re glad to work with Commissioner Buell to ensure that, just as he would never conduct the public’s business without complying with open government laws, we do not conduct the endangered species’ business without complying with the Endangered Species Act.”

The controversial Sharp Park Golf Course is owned by San Francisco but located in suburban San Mateo County. The golf course receives failing grades from golfers in most categories measured by the National Golf Foundation, has lost hundreds of thousands of dollars since 2004, and has been killing two species protected by the Endangered Species Act, the San Francisco garter snake and the California red-legged frog, for decades.

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12/4: Sea Watch for Endangered Sea Creatures

As we close out the 2010 Golden Gate National Parks Endangered Species Big Year, we’re doing a big push to try and find the more elusive endangered species that call the park home. Join us and you just might score some of the more difficult points towards the $1,000 Big Year grand prize!

Saturday, December 4, 2010, 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.— Join Wild Equity Institute Executive Director Brent Plater for a relaxing sea watch at Fort Funston, which has some of the wildest coastal views in San Francisco. We’ll be searching for some of the more elusive sea creatures that call the GGNRA home: Humpback Whale, Steller Sea Lion, and Southern Sea Otters! You never know: might throw in a Marbled Murrelet while we are there. RSVP required: please use the RSVP tool on this website to let us know you’ll attend. Bring spotting scopes and binoculars if you have them; also bring water and snacks to munch on. Meet at the Fort Funston Observation Deck, San Francisco, CA. Part of the Golden Gate National Parks Endangered Species Big Year, a competitive event to see and help save the Parks’ endangered species.

Donate to the Wild Equity Institute Today!

Thank you for supporting our work! There are many ways you can contribute to the Wild Equity Institute’s campaigns and help us build a stronger environmental movement for all.

Become a Member of the Wild Equity Institute.

In honor of the year 2010, our first full year in operation, the Wild Equity Institute is building 10 founding members who will donate $2,000 each and 2,000 members who will donate $10 each to help us fulfill our mission. And for those of you looking for a level of support that is just right, we’re rounding out our campaign by building 100 supporters who will contribute $100 each to WEI. If you are interested in becoming a founding supporter, a member, or contributing to our work at any level, become a member today.

Become a member now with a
credit card or a PayPal account:
Download a membership form
and mail it to:
Wild Equity Institute
PO Box 191695
San Francisco, CA 94119

Become a Monthly Donor.

The best way to sustain our organization is to become a monthly donor. Monthly donations allow us to spend less time fundraising and more time building a healthy and sustainable community for all.

Go to our donate page and fill-out the form to become a monthly donor.

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Life on Edge, Twain's Frog Trips This Weekend

We’re offering two great GGNP Endangered Species Big Year trips this weekend. hope to see you outside exploring our parks!

Life on Edge: Seeing San Francisco’s Endangered SpeciesSaturday, November 20, 2010, 10:00am to 3:00pm — Join local naturalist Matt Zlatunich on a 5-mile hike along the edge of the North American continent. We’ll discover San Francisco’s beautiful habitats and learn about the endangered species that call the area home.  We’ll search for Marbled Murrelet, Western Snowy Plover, San Francisco Lessingia, Humpback Whale and Southern Sea Otter. Bring food and water. Part of the Golden Gate National Parks Endangered Species Big Year, a competition to win $1,000 while seeing and saving the Park’s endangered species. RSVP required: use this website to RSVP. Meet at the Baker Beach north parking lot.

Twain’s Frog and the Beautiful SerpentSunday, November 21, 2010, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.: Join Brent Plater of the Wild Equity Institute to search for two of the most imperiled vertebrate species on the San Francisco peninsula: the California red-legged frog and the San Francisco garter snake. This will be a leisurely walk to enjoy the restoration work being conducted at Mori Point and to learn about the bold steps being taken to save both species from the brink of extinction. RSVP Required: please use this website to RSVP. Rain or Shine. Meet at the Mori Point Entrance Gate, Pacifica, CA, 94044. Part of the Golden Gate National Parks Endangered Species Big Year, a competitive event to help endangered species recover.

Another 100K Down the Drain at Sharp Park Golf Course

November 16, 2010

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Brent Plater, Wild Equity Institute, 415-572-6989

Another 100K of Public Dollars Down the Drain at Sharp Park Golf Course

San Francisco taxpayers billed a half-million dollars
over the past six years for controversial San Mateo County golf course

SAN FRANCISCO— A new analysis of documents recently released by San Francisco’s deficit-ridden Recreation and Parks Department shows that Sharp Park Golf Course lost between $117,000 and $135,000 last fiscal year, bringing the golf course’s total operating losses to at least a half-million dollars since 2004.

“No community center or neighborhood park should have services reduced while the Department is subsidizing suburban golf in San Mateo County,” says Brent Plater, Executive Director of the Wild Equity Institute. “We deserve better: it’s time to close Sharp Park Golf Course and bring the funds saved back to San Francisco’s communities, where the money rightfully belongs.”

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New Binocs Up For Grabs For Big Year Kid Competitors!

Thanks to our generous partnership with REI, the Wild Equity Institute is excited to offer a new Golden Gate National Parks Endangered Species Big Year prize. But this one is just for kids!

If you are under 18 years of age, you are eligible to win a pair of REI’s XR 8 × 25 waterproof binoculars simply by searching the Golden Gate National Parks for endangered species and helping them recover. That’s an $80 retail value: but more importantly, it’s a tool that will give you a leg-up on the competition for the next Endangered Species Big Year!

The eligible person who scores the most points overall in the competition will take home this prize. There is only one pair available, so don’t settle for second place!

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Making the Golden Gate National Parks Accessible

The Golden Gate National Parks are currently undergoing an accessibility study to improve access for people with disabilities. Today, the Wild Equity Institute submitted these comments to the Golden Gate National Parks requesting that the park improve its off-leash dog management as part of its accessibility plan.

Off-leash dogs are one of the key accessibility problems at the Golden Gate National Parks. A 2003 survey conducted by a national guide dog user group indicates that 89% of guide dog users have had their dogs interfered with by off-leash dogs, and 42% of guide dog users have had their guide dogs attacked by off-leash dogs. At best, this can be disorienting for guide dog users. In the worst cases, service dogs have been killed or injured in ways that make them incapable of providing the services the dog was trained for.

Because of this, organizations such as Guide Dogs for the Blind recommend that their graduates avoid any place where off-leash dogs are known to roam. Since off-leash dogs are permitted to roam in nearly every National Park unit in San Francisco, the off-leash policy is a de facto exclusion for guide dog users: in the very park Congress created to make National Park values more accessible to people.

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11/14: Big Year Takes Least Tern to Great Rewards

This weekend the Golden Gate National Parks Endangered Species Big Year is taking to the streets to help save the California Least Tern!

Well, actually we’re heading to a former airstrip in Alameda where the species nests: and helping out with one of the most unusual restoration actions in the Bay Area.

It turns out the ground-nesting California Least Tern lays eggs on bare areas so its light-colored young can avoid predators. So a dedicated crew from Friends of the Alameda Wildlife Refuge is working to make sure this substrate is maintained on the site. Join us, help the great Least Tern, and earn a point toward the Big Year grand prize!

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Saving Sea Turtles from Legal Slaughter

In response to graphic new evidence released by Trini Eco Warriors of endangered sea turtles being legally harvested in Trinidad and Tobago, the Wild Equity Institute’s Executive Director Brent Plater has drafted regulations to make the harvest illegal year-round while creating a protected zone for sea turtles during their nesting season.

View a Summary Slideshow or
Read the Proposed Regulations:

The regulations can be adopted, implemented, and enforced under existing laws protecting wildlife and the marine environment. This crucial element of the proposal allows wildlife officials to act without further authorization from the legislature, where previous attempts to constrain sea turtle killings have been delayed.

“Trinidad and Tobago is one of the world’s great hotspots of biological and cultural diversity,” said Mr. Plater, who served as a Fulbright Scholar at the University of the West Indies at St. Augustine, Trinidad and Tobago earlier this year. “The proposed regulations can help this magnificent country preserve one of its greatest natural treasures expeditiously, effectively, and efficiently.”

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Election Day & a New Day for Sharp Park

An election is always cause for reflection: on the candidates and issues we are asked to support (or oppose); the state of our democracy; and our individual roles within it.

Today is no different. And while it may be some time before the full repercussions of today’s election will be known, we can immediately start reflecting on our relationship to each other and our relationship to the plants and animals that accompany us on Earth.

Here’s to a new opportunity: another chance to get involved and help build a more equitable world for us all. At the Wild Equity Institute, we always have the time to help you find your place within our growing movement to build a healthy and sustainable global community. Contact us to find out how you can become involved in our work.

The work begins near home. Today we stumbled across this photo of Sharp Park’s Laguna Salada. The lagoon is reclaiming it’s historic boundaries with water collected from the winter rains. It reminds us how easily and instantly the floodplain can be restored: and that we can build a better, more sustainable, and more equitable park at Sharp Park, just as nature is already attempting to do.

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