Take Action

Help Restore Sharp Park! Take These Actions Today:

  1. Call the Mayor Today! The Board of Supervisors passed legislation to begin restoration planning at Sharp Park, but Mayor Ed Lee sided with lobbyists for golf purists and coastal developers and vetoed the bill! Call Mayor Ed Lee now at 415-554-6141 and tell him to reverse the veto: because restoring Sharp Park is good government and common sense.
  2. Volunteer with the Wild Equity Institute! You can help us pass this legislation by encouraging your neighbors to contact their Supervisors to support a new National Park at Sharp Park. Join us at fun events to help pass out our Sharp Park Factsheet and our Save Sharp Park Beach Flyer, and show support by attending critical public hearings with the Wild Equity team! Sign-up by calling 415-349-5787 or sending a message to info@wildequity.org.
  3. Donate to the Wild Equity Institute! Become a member of the Wild Equity Institute, or better yet, become a monthly donor and provide sustained support for our work!
  4. Endorse the campaign! Join our growing list of campaign partners. Click here to read a sample letter of support, then e-mail us at info@wildequity.org or call (415) 349-5787 to let us know that your organization wants to endorse the legislation to restore Sharp Park!
  5. Click here to download the Sharp Park restoration booklet and learn more about the restoration vision.
  6. Keep Up-to-date with Wild Equity. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and Join our Cause on Facebook!

Read on:

In November 2009 San Francisco’s Recreation and Parks Department released its long-delayed report on alternative visions for a future Sharp Park. But rather than use the best scientific evidence to create a new vision for Sharp Park, the Recreation and Parks Department’s General Manager Phil Ginsburg recommended armoring the sea wall and selecting an all-golf alternative at Sharp Park, which will cause the beach to erode away and relegate the endangered species to the portions of Sharp Park we know will be impacted by climate change and sea levels rise.

If this alternative is selected by San Francisco, the endangered species on the property will be lost forever, as will the opportunity to build a better public park with recreational amenities everyone can enjoy. You can hear Restore Sharp Park supporters debate the report on KQED’s Forum.

The report contains many surreal statements to help the General Manager support his desired outcome. For example, the report claims that picnicking is the “most significant and widest scale” impact on both species at Sharp Park. You read that right: picnicking—not habitat destruction, not lawn mowers, not even the pumping operations that caused the Fish and Wildlife Service to issue an enforcement letter to the City—is the activity we conservationists should be truly worried about, according to the RPD report.

You don’t need to be an expert to know that lawnmowers and pumping operations have killed more endangered species on the site than your throw rug and bottle of Chianti. But if you had any doubt, check out the evidence yourself at our Video Channel and watch Twain’s Frog and the Beautiful Serpent.

With absurd statements like this, we were glad to see that a peer review team had been established to critique the report. But the General Manager has now cancelled any formal peer review and is trying to push his plan through any politically expedient means at his disposal.

Fortunately, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has told San Francisco that this plan is no recovery plan at all, but is in fact a mitigation plan for the ongoing killing of two endangered species at Sharp Park. As such, San Francisco cannot implement this plan without acquiring mitigation money and securing private lands in trust: adding millions of dollars to the cost of the plan.

Moreover, the SF Weekly’s investigative journalist Peter Jamison recently wrote this cover story on Sharp Park. He found that the underlying expenses of preserving golf on the property are double what Phil Ginsburg promised the Recreation and Parks Commission and the public last November.

Help Restore Sharp Park! Take These Actions Today:

  1. Call the Mayor Today! The Board of Supervisors passed legislation to begin restoration planning at Sharp Park, but Mayor Ed Lee sided with lobbyists for golf purists and coastal developers and vetoed the bill! Call Mayor Ed Lee now at 415-554-6141 and tell him to reverse the veto: because restoring Sharp Park is good government and common sense.
  2. Volunteer with the Wild Equity Institute! You can help us pass this ordinance by encouraging your neighbors to contact their Supervisors to support a new National Park at Sharp Park. Join us at fun events to help pass out our Sharp Park Factsheet and our Save Sharp Park Beach Flyer, and show support by attending critical public hearings with the Wild Equity team! Sign-up by calling 415-349-5787 or sending a message to info@wildequity.org.
  3. Donate to the Wild Equity Institute! Become a member of the Wild Equity Institute, or better yet, become a monthly donor and provide sustained support for our work!
  4. Endorse the campaign! Join our growing list of campaign partners. Click here to read a sample letter of support, then e-mail us at info@wildequity.org or call (415) 349-5787 to let us know that your organization wants to endorse the legislation to restore Sharp Park!
  5. Click here to download the Sharp Park restoration booklet and learn more about the restoration vision.
  6. Keep Up-to-date with Wild Equity. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter, and Join our Cause on Facebook!

Created: October 02, 2009 11:38
Last updated: June 01, 2015 17:01


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